Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Oceans, Rivers and Lakes

We are studying the differences and specific characteristics of these bodies of water.

  OCEANS

An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανόςtransc. Okeanós, the sea of classical antiquity[1]) is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere.[2] On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World Ocean, which covers almost 71% of its surface. These are, in descending order by area, the PacificAtlanticIndianSouthern (Antarctic), and Arctic Oceans.
The bluish color of water is a composite of several contributing agents. Prominent contributors include dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll.[30]
Mariners and other seafarers have reported that the ocean often emits a visible glow which extends for miles at night. In 2005, scientists announced that for the first time, they had obtained photographic evidence of this glow.[31] It is most likely caused by bioluminescence.

RIVERS

river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an oceansealake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size.

LAKES

lake is an area of variable size filled with water, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land, apart from any river or other outlet that serves to feed or drain the lake.[1] Lakes lie on land and are not part of the ocean, and therefore are distinct from lagoons, and are also larger and deeper than ponds, though there are no official or scientific definitions.[2]Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. Most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams.
Natural lakes are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age

Difference between Streams and Creeks



Resultado de imagen para oceans, RIVERS, LAKES